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Locomotives Across Canada - 1 oz. Pure Silver Gold-Plated 3-Coin Subscription - Mintage: 7,500 (2017)

$112.95 CAD  per coin
Issue Name Date Price
1 The 4-4-0 locomotive 11/2017 $112.95
2 The RS 20 locomotive 11/2017 $112.95
3 The GE ES44AC locomotive 11/2017 $112.95
Mintage: 7,500
STATUS:
Canada and US only

Includes beautifully embossed metal tin display case! Order today!

Like modern engines of change, the locomotives of Canada have been instrumental in shaping our nation throughout its 150 years of history. These steam- and diesel-powered vehicles were at the heart of Confederation; helped link two of Canada's coasts; opened up the west to new settlement, and laid the foundations of the multicultural society Canadians enjoy today. They have had an impact on all aspects of Canadian life; by transporting people and goods across this vast nation, the engines featured in the Locomotives Across Canada series of coins represent a historical snapshot of a nation coming into its own, helped by a spirit of innovation that persists today!

An ideal 3-coin gift for any train enthusiast! Order today!

Special features:
  • 3-COIN MONTHLY SUBSCRIPTION! Subscribe today* and then relax knowing you will receive all three coins in the series (each coin priced at $112.95), one coin per month! Coins in your subscription include:
    • Coin 1: The 4-4-0 locomotive (priced at $112.95)
    • Coin 2: The RS 20 locomotive (priced at $112.95)
    • Coin 3: The GE ES44AC locomotive (priced at $112.95)
  • Even the finest details shine in each meticulous design, thanks to the precision engraving, and the use of multiple finishes that add subtle contrasts.
  • SELECTIVE GOLD PLATING! The selective application of gold plating shines the spotlight on each locomotive, while the gold-plated effigy ensures an elegance that makes this a truly exceptional keepsake.
  • FREE EMBOSSED METAL TIN DISPLAY BOX! Order the subscription and receive a FREE embossed metal tin box with your third coin to display all three coins!
  • LIMITED MINTAGE: Only 7,500 coins will be made available worldwide. Hurry and order yours today before they are all gone!
  • ONE-OUNCE 99.99% PURE SILVER COINS! Your coins are GST/HST exempt!

About each coin design:
First coin:
The 4-4-0 locomotive

Designed by Canadian artist David A. Oram, the first coin in your subscription transports you to Toronto, ON, in the year of Confederation: 1867. The selective application of gold plating immediately draws the eye to the 4-4-0 locomotive of the Great Western Railway (GWR) in the foreground. The left-side three-quarter view allows for a thorough examination of the steam engine's defining characteristics—from the balloon smoke stack and large driving wheels to the cattle guard—all rendered in outstanding detail. In the background, the arched train shed of GWR's Yonge Street passenger station adds an architectural point of interest, while the horse-drawn carriage waiting trackside completes this meticulously engraved snapshot of a bygone era.

On track to Confederation—and beyond

Named for its wheel configuration of four leading (front) wheels and four driving ones, the iconic 4-4-0 "American" type of locomotive looms large in Canada's railway history as the quintessential all-purpose locomotive of its time. Its speed, performance and ease of repair made it a practical choice for Canada's rapidly expanding railroad networks, where its wheelbase proved adept at handling varying rail grades and curvatures. Well suited to freight and passenger service, the 4-4-0 is remembered today as the most common locomotive in service between 1850 and 1890, and the first type ever built in Canada.

The height of the 4-4-0's popularity coincided with Confederation—a time when Canadian union hinged on the promise of a railway link, which was fulfilled in the east with the completion of the Intercolonial Railway in 1872. By then, the 4-4-0 represented the overwhelming majority of the steam locomotives in service, including those that helped open the continent to new settlement in the west. Design adjustments and a larger boiler size resulted in more powerful 4-4-0 engines; but tasked with increasingly heavier loads, the 4-4-0's limited firing capacity eventually led to its falling out of favour when larger engines (such as the Ten-Wheelers) entered the fray.

Did you know…
  • Canada's love for railroads began with the first railway constructed in 1836: the Champlain and Saint Lawrence Rail Road.
  • Prior to 1853, all locomotives in British North America were imported from the United States or from Great Britain.
  • In 1848, the Montreal and Lachine Railroad purchased one of the first 4-4-0 locomotives to be used here in Canada.
  • Inaugurated in 1853, the Great Western Railway began operating with six 4-4-0 locomotives that had been shipped from the United States.
  • On April 16, 1853, the Toronto Locomotive Work completed work on the first locomotive built in Canada: a 4-4-0 steam engine known as the Toronto.

Second coin: The RS 20 locomotive

Designed by Canadian artist John Mantha, your coin looks back at the first wave of diesel-electric locomotives that were introduced in Canada in the 1940s and 1950s. Used by the Roberval and Saguenay Railway, the RS 20 was the first diesel road locomotive manufactured in Canada, and was built in 1949 by Montreal Locomotive Works. The selective application of gold plating places the focus on the early RS-2 road-switcher, which is made all the more visible thanks to the tiger-striped pattern, painted at the front. The rail yard in the engraved background is bustling with activity, and typifies the environment in which these versatile workhorses shine.

Driving change in Canada

The early 20th century saw a rapid expansion of new railways across the country, and in areas further north than ever before. Trains had become the backbone of industry in Canada, allowing an easy flow of goods and services while transporting an unprecedented wave of immigration to regions that were once remote. The railway companies also spurred a budding tourism industry, by building resort hotels and launching campaigns that touted Canada's great natural beauty to the travellers of the world.

But the First World War marked a period of great change in Canada's railway history. Steam locomotives continued to sustain Canada's economy while supporting the war effort by transporting troops; but the limited availability of trainmen, a reduced ridership, and unrestrained expansion exacerbated the financial problems of many Canadian railways. In 1917, a royal commission recommended the nationalization of all railways—except the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR). And by 1923, the Canadian Northern Railway, Intercolonial, National Transcontinental Railway, Grand Trunk Railway and Grand Trunk Pacific Railway were all amalgamated to form the Canadian National Railways (CNR). Gone was the great era of railway construction; decades later, the golden age of steam railways was itself relegated to the history books with the advent of a new technology: the diesel locomotive.

Did you know…
  • The first diesel-electric locomotive used in Canada, CNR 9000, was built in 1929 from coupled engines that could each generate 950 kW of power and weighed a combined 335 tonnes. 
  • Until the end of the Second World War, most of Canada's diesel locomotives were low-powered engines. Diesel-electric technology was largely used in submarines during the war, but was gradually extended to railways during the post-war period.
  • By 1960, steam locomotives were no longer used by either CNR or CPR for regularly scheduled service.
  • The diesel engine doesn't directly move the wheels that propel the locomotive forward—it drives an electrical generator, which powers the traction motors that make the wheels turn. 
  • The tiger-like stripes on the front of a locomotive are deliberately painted to improve the locomotive's visibility.

Third coin: The GE ES44AC locomotive

In keeping with the first two coins in the series, this reverse design by Canadian artist John Mantha features selective gold plating that shines the spotlight on the General Electric ES44AC locomotive. The background features an outstanding amount of engraved detail that captures the majesty of Canada's diverse landscape: from the far-off mountain peak to the different textures of the surrounding vegetation, down to the gravel along the railroad ties. The shine of the coin's silver surface also lends itself well to evoking the brightness of a summer day—in the sky, and on the surface of the winding river beneath it. Rounding the curves in the track, the gold-plated ES44AC locomotive is positioned in a way that allows for an ideal view of its front and side. The remarkable power of this fuel-efficient locomotive is evident in an almost endless line of railcars that stretch out behind it.

Packaging:

Your coins are each encapsulated and presented in a beautiful embossed metal tin that complements the theme and adds a sense of nostalgia to this collecting experience. The collector case will be shipped to you with the third coin as part of this 3-coin subscription program.

Order your 3-coin subscription today!

* Credit card purchases only, charged upon shipment. After purchasing your first coin, you will automatically receive the subsequent coins when they are released. Coins may not be issued in the same order as listed herein. Subscription agreement may be cancelled at your request at any time with a phone call or written notice to the Royal Canadian Mint.

Reviews

Great coins but disapointing

3

It is a great set of coins. hopefully others coins will be made with at least the confederation train.

Freeranger

qc

Yes

Fantastic set.

5

I am very pleased with the set. It shows very well in my display case. As a subscription one has to be patient as each piece was shipped individually as one per month. The billing for each coin was also monthly so much easier to afford (although not cheap). The collectors case came a day or so after the last coin (the GE locomotive). The case is a simple canister with a lid. The black colour really makes the coins stand out.

James

Victoria

Yes

Display case was shipped separately

4

Please note that the display case was not shipped with the third coin. The coin arrived first.

Canadian Coin Collector

Ottawa, Ontario

Yes

Fantastic Gift

5

These coins are fantastic! Just got my third, and all three are great. Will hold a place of honour in my collection.

Catseye

Okotoks

Yes

These coins need a display case not the cheap plastic holder

1

Nice design and quality but needs a case to display in I have bought less expensive coins that came with a display cases but the mint went cheap on this series of coins which unfortunately takes away from their value.

Rogi

Mississauga On

No

155142en

3.6 5

80.0

Is the display case available with no coins?

Rob

Hi Rob, Unfortunately, we only have enough cases for each set of coins. We don't have extra ones to sell separately. If you're looking for something to store/display coins in, we do sell various sized "floating frames". Here's the link to our accessories page where they're all listed; http://www.mint.ca/store/buy/accessories_coins-cat120008

Chad

I have received my 3 coins and my metal case. They look great. I have a question with regards to the case. I notice there is a divider after the top 3 coin layer. Below the divider there is another opening it looks like it is for a coin. Please advise as to what this is for.

Jackie

Hi Jackie, The opening under the tray that holds the three coins is to keep the certificates of authenticity in one convenient space should you want to.

Melanie (Product Team)

Is there a way to just order one of the coins in this series or do I have to buy all three?

TougherLoki

Hi TougherLoki, Since this products features a free embossed metal tin display case for each customer to display all three coins in, we're only selling the three coins together.

Chad

Just received the 3rd coin in the Locomotives series but no case. Is the case also coming on its own? (I assumed it would ship with the 3rd coin)Thanks. mike

none

Hi, The embossed metal tin display case is shipped separately around the same time as the 3rd coin, but they are sent in separate parcels. So it should be arriving soon. If it does not, please contact our customer service department (1-800-267-1871) and they'll be happy to look into this for you.

Chad

I tried to subscribe but the store says not available. Is there any way to but the coins?

GEcoins

Hi GEcoins, You can order this subscription on Mint.ca. It's just not available in our three stores (Ottawa, Winnipeg and Vancouver) because our stores do not carry the metal tin display boxes. If you order on Mint.ca you'll receive the coins (1 coin per month) and the free metal tin display box will be shipped with your third coin.

Chad

I have received 2 of the coins to date but I have not received the metal tin display box. Will this be shipped with the 3rd coin in the series? Thank you.

David

Hi David, The free embossed metal tin display case will arrive around the same time as your 3rd coin.

Chad

I was wodering is this package not include Box of the website I saw that Box ?

Mei Huang

Hi Mei Huang, Yes, the free embossed metal tin box is sent with your third coin to display all three coins!

Chad

if the Composition is 99.99% pure silver that's mean that ,the coin have ,01% of gold? Right? because the coin is Gold-Plated? Right? thank's

Francois

Hi Francois, Thank you for your question. 99.99% is the purity of the silver. The gold plating does not effect the purity of the silver. Thank you. Melanie

Melanie (Product Team)

Is the ALCO RS-20 locomotive a RS-2 or 3? There does not appear to be a RS-20 designation for 4 axle ALCO diesel road switchers that Canadian railroads operated.

Bob

The locomotive featured on this coin is the RS 20 for Roberval & Saguenay No 20. "RS 20" is the road number (or "reporting mark") and means Roberval & Saguenay No 20, i.e. that's the identity of the locomotive given by the railway using it. "RS 2" is the builder's classification and means "Road Switcher" second model. It was given by ALCO (the original designer and builder of the type) and its subsidiaries, such as MLW.

Melanie (Product Team)

RS 20 is for Roberval and Saguenay 20, the railroad and road number of the locomotive shown.

Ben

Realistically it should read R&S #20 not RS20. It's just a common non-railfan error. LOL.

cudasteve

Just an FYI to you on the Locomotives Across Canada Series. The second coin you state that the locomotive is and ALCO RS 20. That is incorrect. The RS 20 was a later low or chopped nose ALCO version. The one you have pictured on the coin is actually an RS 2. These were built from 1946-1950. The main spotting feature between the RS 2 and RS 3 was the battery box that was just forward of the cab on the left floor board area.

Cudasteve

Thank you for your question. The locomotive featured on this coin is the RS 20 (Roberval & Saguenay No 20). "RS 20" is the road number (or "reporting mark") and means Roberval & Saguenay No 20, i.e. that's the identity of the locomotive given by the railway using it. "RS 2" is the builder's classification and means "Road Switcher" second model. It was given by ALCO (the original designer and builder of the type) and its subsidiaries, such as MLW. The RS 20 is preserved at Exporail in St-Constant, Quebec.

Melanie (Product Team)

Specifications

  • No.155142
  • Mintage7,500
  • Composition99.99% pure silver
  • Finishproof
  • Weight (g) 31.39
  • Diameter (mm) 38
  • Edgeserrated
  • Certificateserialized
  • Face value20 dollars
  • ArtistDavid A. Oram (first coin), John Mantha (second and third coins) (reverse), Susanna Blunt (obverse)
Accessed November 21, 2017