Back to Articles

Behind the Design: Shared Experiences Woven Together in Truth

  • Sep 29, 2022
  • History
  • 5 minute read

The Truth and Reconciliation Keepsake honours the more than 150,000 First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children who were taken from their families and forced to attend Residential Day and Boarding Schools across Canada. It acknowledges the intergenerational impacts of the Residential Day and Boarding School era, and it invites reflection on how people in Canada can meet the challenge of reconciliation in our everyday lives.

The design of this Keepsake was a cooperative effort led by three talented Indigenous artists representing First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities who worked together with Survivors to create an appropriate and thoughtful design marking the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Learn more about the details of the Keepsake design below.

History
History

Artists Leticia Spence (First Nations), Jason Sikoak (Inuit) and JD Hawk (Métis).

The Truth and Reconciliation Keepsake honours the more than 150,000 First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children who were taken from their families and forced to attend Residential Day and Boarding Schools across Canada. It acknowledges the intergenerational impacts of the Residential Day and Boarding School era, and it invites reflection on how people in Canada can meet the challenge of reconciliation in our everyday lives.

The design of this Keepsake was a cooperative effort led by three talented Indigenous artists representing First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities who worked together with Survivors to create an appropriate and thoughtful design marking the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Learn more about the details of the Keepsake design below.